Tag: carpatho-rusyn artist from hungary

Anatáz Fedinecz – “it polished my palette”

Exhibition of Anataz Fedinecz from 2008. Source: https://picasaweb.google.com/ruszinok/HatvaniKiLlTSFedineczAtanZ
Exhibition of Anataz Fedinecz from 2008. Source: https://picasaweb.google.com/ruszinok/HatvaniKiLlTSFedineczAtanZ

You would be amused if you saw me researching Rusyn artists who relocated to Hungary and finding all the information in Hungarian: I am staring at the unknown words, feeling very important, scanning through page after page, hoping to pinpoint a familiar word that I could decipher – never happens :-).

Anataz Fedinecz was an accomplished painter, and a physician by profession, like his father. He immigrated to Hungary in 1980. His art never failed to express his deep connection to his birth land. But let’s hear him say it:

“The rich historical and intellectual past of my Motherland, its unique landscape formed and polished my palette – up till now they are inexhaustible sources of my art. I am proud of being born in the Karpaths and in my art I put up an external memory to my Motherland.” (1)

In 2005 he was awarded the prestigious PRO CULTURA MINORITATUM HUNGARIAE for his outstanding work in preserving and transmitting the Carpatho-Rusyn culture, thus adding to the efforts aimed at a peaceful co-existence of different ethnic groups living in the foothills of the Carpathian Mountains. He passed away in November 2012.

Source: Anataz Gallery
Source: Anataz Gallery
Source: Anataz Gallery
Source: Anataz Gallery

Ivan Manajlo – a timeless, borderless art

I already introduced you to the work of the Rusyn “Barbizon” icon Fedor Manaylo and his grandson András Manajló. Well, I skipped one generation in the process and saved Fedor’s son, Iván, for last. When you explore these links, you can easily compare and contrasts the styles of the grandfather, the father and the son, creating a wonderful gallery of impressions in your mind.

Iván Manajló was born in Uzhhorod and, luckily for us, followed his father’s footsteps. His first solo exhibition took place in 1961. He drew inspiration from nature, but also from the emotions associated with it, thus exploring the relationship between the objective and the subjective. If I had to categorize, I would say that his work is strikingly modern and not necessarily tied to his origins. We have artists whose subject matter is Carpatho-Rusyn in absolute cultural terms (Kostka, Brenzovich, Sholtes). Not Manajlo’s – his art is international, borderless and timeless, in a sense, and I have to bring to your attention the Modernist, Post-impressionist and Fauvist elements (line and color) which you can observe in the following samples of his work (all taken with the permission of  András Manajló):

 

András Manajló

András Manajló (he lives in Hungary, hence the spelling of his name) is a grandson of Fedor Manaylo, one of the founders of the Transcarpathian School of Painting, and a son of Iván Manajlo. He is an internationally recognized artist in his own right, exhibiting in Royal Opera Arcade Gallery, London, Abu Dabi Art Hub or The Art Mathieu Gallery in Switzerland. Manajló creates beautifully atmospheric works, with ever-changing colors, forms and shapes that make a strong emotional and an aesthetic impact on the viewer.

The knife work in his landscapes is creative and precise, the light in his urban and Mediterranean pieces warm and glowing, the color palette is rich and intense, and the counterpoised hues feed off of each other in ways that never tire, creating stunning effects. I greatly encourage you to explore András’ webpage where you can see large-resolution images with a great detail.